Posts Tagged ‘scicomm’

Back To The Future, Too: What Is Needed To Bring Life Science Marketing To 2015?

Back To The Future, Too: What Is Needed To Bring Life Science Marketing To 2015?

It happened again. We were invited to meet with what we thought was a forward-thinking life science company to discuss social media and digital marketing. They seemed to have done their homework about what we do, but we were soon barraged with questions about the utility of social media for life science marketing. When talking to many life science companies about marketing, especially those in the tools space, sometimes we feel as though we’re trying to sell them Marty McFly’s futuristic hoverboard from the movie Back to the Future Part II. However, it is 2015, the year in which the movie took place, and such “futuristic” technologies should be as commonplace as video calls, another prediction from the 1989 movie. Why are life science companies so behind on incorporating these marketing strategies? Here we outline some changes that we feel need to happen before life science marketers will adapt to using social media. More acceptance from scientists. My esteemed colleague Hamid Ghanadan, who is always blazing trails for life science marketing at The Linus Group, said to me once “life science companies will start using social media once their customers, research scientists, do.” In that statement, he expertly distilled one […]

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In Defense Of Marketing: Life Scientists Should Embrace, Not Eschew It

In Defense Of Marketing: Life Scientists Should Embrace, Not Eschew It

I’ll have to admit I got very irritated at a recent article on Scientific American’s (SciAm) new Food Matters blog about going on a “marketing diet” to lose weight, claiming that marketing is the root of the problem. As a consumer, mother of a teen, and follower of fast food critic Michael Pollan, I agree whole heartedly with the concept that in the US we are being barraged with advertisements for portions that are too large and that there is a big problem. However, putting the field of marketing to blame, rather than societal values, capitalism, or myriad other factors, is unfair. I take issue with the fact that a leading blog is sending a message to scientists that all marketing is evil, because this discipline has the potential to guide researchers to help themselves and the industry in many important ways. Let’s start out with some definitions and clarifications. In the SciAm article, the author refers negatively to the American Marketing Association’s (AMA) 2004 definition of marketing because it serves stakeholders: Marketing is an organizational function and a set of processes for creating, communicating and delivering value to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the […]

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Getting Financial Support For Your Blog Without Selling Your Soul: Presenting At ScienceOnline 2013 #scio13

Mary presented a short session at the recent ScienceOnline conference in North Carolina aimed at helping bloggers get funded. We are continuing the dialog using #sciopartners on Twitter and with resources at comprendia.com/sciopartners. Fill out a short form there to get started! Getting Financial Support For Your Blog Without Selling Your Soul from Mary Canady

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Who’s Talking About ScienceOnline? Interactive Map Of 1000 #Scio13 Twitterers

View Larger Map We’re a big fan of ScienceOnline, the yearly conference which brings together bloggers, journalists, educators, and anyone interested in the great science that is being done online. With the help of some other enthusiasts in Southern California, we are forming a local chapter and will host some events in conjunction with the San Diego Biotechnology Network (follow @sciosocal for updates). We wanted to find local Twitterers who might be interested in this endeavor, and analyzed around 5300 Tweets from about 1300 people using the hashtag since December of last year (even though the conference does not take place until January 2013, the hashtag is used to continue the conversation year round). We were able to find and map the location of a little over 1000 of the Twitterers, and they are shown in the interactive map (see a little more ‘how to’ information here). View the map on Google to see an alphabetized list as well. Each person Tweeted #scio13 at least once, and since we’re just over 1000 people, the limit for Google Maps, you can download the KML file and view it on Google Earth if you’d like to see the last few (sorry Z’s!). […]

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Four Ways To Attract And Engage Life Scientists For Your Next Event

Four Ways To Attract And Engage Life Scientists For Your Next Event

We’ve been organizing life science events for more than 3 years now and we see the need more than ever to help biotech researchers and professionals network. Creating an engaging event with notoriously shy people isn’t always easy, and we’ve had both missteps and real winning ideas. We’d like to see more successful events being held and see a real opportunity for organizations and companies to get involved. Here are four ways we’ve found to get scientists to attend, engage, and get more out of events, which benefits all involved. Speed Networking. If you’ve done speed dating, you’ll get this easily. Check out our post on the San Diego Biotechnology Network site for all the details, and here is the rundown. Arrange tables in a “U” shape and place chairs matched across the table on the inside and outside. Have everyone take a seat and make sure all have partners, then give them 4 minutes to talk. Prep them by telling them to bring lots of business cards and to craft a 30 second ‘elevator speech’ to describe who they are and what they’re looking for. Bring a timer and use a microphone to announce the 4 minute warning–you’ll get […]

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Where Are The Science Communicators? Interactive Map of 1000+ #SciComm Twitterers

View Larger Map In anticipation of our science communication event this month, we’ve been thinking about the topic which is discussed using the #SciComm hashtag on Twitter. We started looking at more than 5000 Twitter status updates tagged with #SciComm from the last nine months and found that the group is scientifically diverse but singular in their passion to improve the way information is exchanged. Because #SciComm is not a high volume hashtag, commercial tools to find users aren’t sufficient, so we looked to our own data and some publicly available tools. We created an interactive map of 1000+ Twitterers using the #SciComm hashtag and present the some of the data here. We used the Google Maps API and Yahoo Pipes to create what’s called a KML (Keyhole Markup Language, a type of XML) file from the biographies of every Twitterer who has used the #SciComm hashtag since last June, and this was used to generate the interactive map. We’ve tried in the past to follow Twitterer locations using the geotags on the status updates, but only a small percentage of people use them, so they were not efficacious. The data needed to be manipulated a bit more to provide […]

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New Media Science Communication, What’s Working? Our #EB2012 Event Will Highlight #SciComm Successes

We were thrilled when the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology asked us to host an event with them during the Experimental Biology (#EB2012) conference this month in San Diego, see descriptions of it on the SDBN blog and ASBMB website. The event will focus on improving science communication (#SciComm), and as you know we’re big proponents of using new media towards this end. We’ve seen some spectacular examples of scientists and organizations using new tools to reach their peers, the public, and even to get funding. Here, we highlight great examples of new media science communication, and invite those who will be attending the #EB2012 event (#EB2012Tweetup) to share their own stories. #IAmScience. Kevin Zelnio, a freelance science writer who blogs for the DeepSeaNews and Scientific American, started a meme on Twitter around non-traditional paths to becoming a scientist. He found that many scientists described surprisingly diverse paths to becoming a scientist, fueled by passion more than genius (see the video of the Tweets). He thought that the collected stories would make a great resource to personalize scientists and encourage those who are intimidated because they see a scientific career as a ‘one size fits all’ endeavor. He […]

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