Posts Tagged ‘market research’

How To Help Your Life Science Organization Be More Strategic: A Cure For “Tactitis”

How To Help Your Life Science Organization Be More Strategic: A Cure For "Tactitis"

We’ve got to hand it to life science marketers. Many are entrepreneurs with a great product, while others have been successfully selling products on the internet for years, before it was so commonplace. Which type of preparation is more important for being successful in this environment, undergoing lengthy scientific training or learning marketing acumen with courses or a degree in business? As I was starting out in the field, I remember my boss telling me that a solid science degree is most important, as “marketing is easy to learn.” While I agree, I also find that there is a strong tendency in life science to eschew the formal discipline of marketing in favor of employing tactics which “have always worked” or “seem to work for others.” We have a name for this pervasive reliance on tactics, rather than a solid life science marketing strategy: Tactitis. Below we list the top ways to cure this ailment as well as ways to tactfully (get it?) respond to those in your organization who suffer from this devastating disease. Write a Marketing Plan. This advice may seem pedantic, but we run across many life science marketers who skip this important step. Creating a marketing […]

Read more

Life Science Market Research: Get Better Results With Our Checklist

Life Science Market Research: Get Better Results With Our Checklist

We’ve covered before how conducting your own life science market research is easier than before because of new software and communication channels. Life science companies should be querying customers’ needs more frequently in order to engage them with social and digital marketing, which is necessary in a post-broadcast world. Below are listed the top items you’ll need to consider in planning your life science market research project to ensure success. Actionable Objectives. I had a boss once (who became a mentor) who said to me when I was developing a survey “I don’t want you to have a lot of data at the end, and not know what the next steps are.” Ever since then, I’ve always started a market research product by defining up to 3 actionable objectives. In other words, define the big picture questions that need to be answered and also how the data will be used to support business decisions. An example would be “We need to determine the customer’s biggest pain in the area of next generation sequencing software, so that we can develop the right features for our next release.” Each survey question should directly support an objective, and if it doesn’t, take it […]

Read more

Why You Should Be Doing More Life Science Market Research

Why You Should Be Doing More Life Science Market Research

So many things have changed in the digital age that it is sometimes hard to judge which parts of your marketing plan should change, and which should remain constant. Life science market research is an area in which we recommend you revise your strategy, and we explain the top five reasons below. Increasing segmentation. Life scientists are becoming more segmented online, being able to choose from myriad journal feeds and news sources that fit their research field. Methods for reaching your customers must be equally segmented, and you need to understand their needs and habits. The results and even the process of doing more market research will benefit you. For example, if you promote your survey on Twitter and don’t get a good response, you know that this application is not a good way to reach your customers. Improving the amount and relevancy of your life science market research will ensure that you know the best way to reach and engage your customers. Need for customer engagement. Your customers are now choosing which life science companies, if any, to follow and interact with online. These decisions require engagement, whether it be liking a Facebook page, commenting on a post, or […]

Read more

#ls_chat 10/12/2011: Life Science Company Communication & Customer Grievances

[View the story “#ls_chat 10/12/2011: Life Science Company Communication & Customer Grievances” on Storify]

Read more

Introducing The Life Science Twitter Chat: Improving Communication Between Researchers and Companies

Comprendia’s mission is to improve communication in the life science industry, and a big part of this is opening up more of a dialog between companies and researchers. We think social media is a perfect venue for discussions, and are co-founding a biweekly life science chat on Twitter. Life scientists and company representatives can openly discuss issues important for advancing research through a better understanding of the challenges faced by each. Many life science companies have a presence on Twitter, but we see them mostly as being in broadcast mode, simply tweeting about products and promotions and not engaging with scientists. We were approached by one life scientist on twitter who wanted us to connect them with a company as their efforts to engage with them regarding a large equipment purchase had not been fruitful. With an email, we were able to connect them, but the process would have been much easier if the company had been available and responsive on Twitter. Life scientists have questions directly relating to existing products as well as ideas for new ones. Companies want to hear this information and ask questions about their performance and perception. A Twitter chat will bring the two sides […]

Read more

Small-Scale Survey Suggests Life Science Companies Will Significantly Increase Social Media Advertising in 2011

A recent survey of life science marketers found that 52% plan to increase their level of new and social media advertising in 2011. The study, conducted by life science consulting firm Comprendia LLC, was comprised of thirty-three respondents working in the non-FDA regulated sector, dealing with products for research use only. When asked which social media applications were most utilized, Twitter and Facebook were the top results, with 58% and 39% using them daily or one or two times a week, respectively. Respondents indicated that social media monitoring is also prevalent, with more than 60% indicating they track mentions of their brand on social networks. The long term effects of these trends are unclear, but it is possible that increased interaction between these life science companies, their customers, and independent science communicators portends the development of better products and increased progress in biotechnology research. 2011 Life Science Social Media Marketing Survey January 2011 View more presentations from Mary Canady. Download the PDF of the presentation. These results indicate a shift from traditional, broadcast marketing such as print advertisements and even online banners to new, more engaging methods such as social networks and blogs. Are life science marketers fully ready for […]

Read more

Discover Life Science Social Media Marketing Trends: Take Our Survey

Want to know what life science marketers are doing about social media and how you can keep up? Take our short survey and be the first to get the report in a few weeks: http://bit.ly/lifescismsurvey Note that it is intended for people involved in the marketing and sales of non-FDA regulated products (e.g., products sold to the research market). Contact us with any questions and feel free to distribute to your marketing, BD, management or sales colleagues (functions vary due to size of company).

Read more

A Picture is Worth 1K Words: Using Word Clouds for Life Science Marketing and Communication

Life Technologies Social Media Word Cloud made using the RSS Feed and Tagxedo (click to enlarge) Word or tag clouds are visualizations which help us to understand the meaning of an aggregate of text by correlating the size of the words with their prevalence in it. As the title suggests, the picture shown here describes the concept best. While the depictions are often correlated with blogs, twitter streams, and other social media, their utility extends beyond this area. In this post, we list several ways that life science companies can use word clouds to understand customers’ needs and adapt marketing and communication strategies to meet them. Analyzing Social Media Sentiment. For the life science marketer, comments made by life scientists on social media applications represent an ‘amorphous’ form of market research. Instead of direct questions being asked and answered, researchers give candid opinions about research areas, products, events, or anything else they want to talk about. As an example, check out the word cloud made from the Society for Neuroscience 2010 meeting tweets. From this cloud, you can see that important topics at the meeting were Glenn Close‘s talk, an article about spooky coloured auras (from a non-American author), and […]

Read more

The Life Science Marketing Plan, Part 2: Components (First Half)

The Life Science Marketing Plan, Part 2: Components (First Half)

Each post in our Life Science Marketing Plan series will help you piece together a ‘map’ that is representative of the analyses and learning process that will help you define your marketing strategies and tactics for the year. In the first part of this series, we provided and outline and described why marketing plans are needed for life science companies of all sizes to meet their goals. In this post, we’ll define the first half of the components in detail. Let’s get started! Executive Summary. Even though this part of the marketing plan is at the beginning, it is written at the end. Writing a marketing plan is like a journey, and at the end of it you will have learned a lot and have a clear understanding of the strategies and tactics needed to help you reach your goals. Keep in mind that several people, especially senior management, will read only this part of your marketing plan, so summarize the report here and don’t worry about being a bit redundant. Feel free to reference figures and tables in the report for easy and quick analysis. Also, if there’s a point you’d like to make to senior management (e.g., I […]

Read more