Posts Tagged ‘life science companies’

#Sciopartners Continued: Conference Connections For Life Science Bloggers And Companies

#Sciopartners Continued: Conference Connections For Life Science Bloggers And Companies

My recent trip to the ScienceOnline conference to make the #Sciopartners presentation was cut short due to travel difficulties and I didn’t get to meet as many of the attendees as I would have liked to. I started thinking about how I’ve made connections with bloggers outside of that meeting in the past, and Tweetups, etc. at other life science conferences have helped a lot. I had an ‘aha’ moment shortly after these neurons fired and realized we could be a conduit for life science bloggers and companies to meet. The fact that communication is moving online makes in person meetings all the more valuable for maintaining relationships. Media shifts bring opportunities for both bloggers and companies to work together to advance scientific research. We created two word clouds for this post’s image based on these two partners’ online content, with the largest words representing the most popular topics. For the word cloud on the left in black, we used content from 4 major life science company websites: Sigma Aldrich, Life Technologies, Bio-Rad, Affymetrix, and New England Biolabs. The right word cloud in white is from Researchblogging and represents the topics written about there. Like any partnership, the two halves […]

Read more

Helping Life Science Companies Empower Bloggers At ScienceOnline #scio12

We’re gearing up to attend ScienceOnline 2012 (#scio12) in North Carolina next week, a place where bloggers, educators, and anyone interested in science communication online meet. The conference is growing due to many factors, including the way the fantastic organizers structure the event and increasing importance of science online for the public, scientists, and companies. We see great synergies between bloggers and life science companies, something we covered after we attended the conference last year. Bloggers are digital influencers, reaching life scientists with great content and even becoming an important source of news for the area they cover. They require financial support to keep their blogs running and expand. This need represents an opportunity for life science companies, who are often looking for ways to promote their research tools online other than using a banner ad on a crowded news website. We’d like to make connections between bloggers and life science companies as we have broad networks in both areas. We’re meeting with as many bloggers as possible at #scio12, fill out one of the forms below so we can start making connections. Blogger form Company form Also, join the #ls_chat Friday January 13th at 10 a.m. PT to discuss […]

Read more

#ls_chat 11/16: Life Science Funding Issues & #scifund

View this story on Storify. View the story “#ls_chat 11/16: Life Science Funding Issues & #scifund” on Storify]

Read more

Social Media: The Seth Godin Trifecta

Seth Godin is a true thought leader in social media–he understood it years or maybe even a decade before many. Three of his books have literally changed the way I think about marketing and even the course of progress in many areas. Here is a short review of the books, and they’re all good and short reads, I suggest you pick them all up (each is linked to its Amazon page, and I swear I’m getting no kickbacks!). Permission Marketing. This book was published in 1999 and truly shows that Godin was ahead of the curve, defining new media marketing strategies and tactics before the term ‘social media’ was even recognized. I call this the ‘newsletter book’ because it espouses getting permission to market to customers and uses newsletters as a prime example. In short, create marketing materials such as newsletters which provide value to your customers outside of your products, and they will give you permission to market to them. Need an example from life science? We worked with San Diego-based specialty chemicals and services provider BioBlocks to help them create a newsletter featuring the research behind their products–see an example here. As a result, they’ve increased their reach […]

Read more

Your Newsletter: It’s Not All About You

Life sciences companies can be divided three ways: those who don’t have a newsletter, those who have one, and those who have one and understand the purpose. Companies often see the newsletter as simply a way to showcase new products, and see it as a monthly chore. As we’ve discussed, this ‘broadcasting’ of your products is much less effective these days, as customers have a lot of ‘noise’ to sort through during their daily routine. A company newsletter should focus on your customers, not you. If they simply want to see a list of new products, they’ll visit the website. Here’s an example to help understand how to ‘turn around’ your thinking on newsletter content. I have a friend who’s a photographer, and I was trying to talk her into sending her clients a newsletter (yes, I think marketing 24/7). She replied “Why would I want to send my clients information about photography and how I shoot pictures?” She is thinking that a newsletter is about her company. Instead, I suggested that she give her clients information that may be considered tangential to her business, but very relevant to her clients. For example, for her wedding photography clients, send tips […]

Read more

WordPress Wrevolution

When I started Comprendia little over a year ago, I actually had some doubt as to whether WordPress, a software popular for blogging, could be used to create my entire site. With the knowledge I had of web programming and WordPress, some through my personal usage, I quickly developed a branded, web 2.0 site. Now, it appears to me as if WordPress is taking over. If you look closely, you’ll see many websites are using it. Several nice examples of corporate WordPress sites exist here and here. Why is WordPress so great? It has a highly customizable front end, with a user friendly back end as well. This translates into professional-looking websites which can be easily edited by non-professionals. This combination creates the potential to make businesses of all sizes more functional on-line and responsive to their customers, even if they choose not to use WordPress blogging feature. It is a stellar example of open source software, meaning that developers literally all over the world have written ‘plugins’ and ‘themes’ for it, making it infinitely customizable. Using it, I created the Comprendia site and the SDBN site quickly. Both are branded sites with many web 2.0 features, and I am […]

Read more