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Posts Tagged ‘hashtag’

Life Science Conferences and Twitter: What Factors Lead To Better Engagement?

It’s been about nine months since we did our initial report on the utilization of hashtags at life science conferences. Now that the spring 2012 conference ‘season’ is almost over, we wanted to look at Twitter conversations tracked by the hashtags for each event. By tabulating the number of Twitter status updates and comparing it to the total number of attendees, we find that between 3.5 and 12.5% of life science conference attendees Tweet about the event. Here we discuss the trends and factors which affect life science conference Twitter engagement with an eye towards improving communication, resulting in a better experience for all. We judged the amount of Twitter activity by looking at the number of attendees, the number of status updates or Tweets, and number Twitterers for five of the major life science conferences since November 2011. Some meetings (ASCB, SLAS) were not included in the analysis because their Tweet volume was much smaller. Additionally, conferences for the ‘uber engaged’ scientists such as ScienceOnline were not included as their stats would dwarf that of the ‘mainstream’ conferences. The results of these tabulations are shown in the table below. Conference No. Attendees No. Tweets % Attendees Tweeting Hashtag Listing […]

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What Is A Scientific Social Network? 6 Thriving and Inspiring Examples

What Is A Scientific Social Network? 6 Thriving and Inspiring Examples

A recent article from the Huffington Post states that social networks for scientists won’t work because there is no incentive from a career perspective. The piece focuses on ResearchGate and takes a stab at the Economist’s article about the community. Here at Comprendia, we’ve never advocated that Facebook should be recreated for scientists, as there are 700,000+ life science graduates in the US already using the application,* and they are likely already connected there to lab mates and colleagues. Rather, we should broaden our idea of the ‘social network’ to include any online community of scientists, not just those which are similar to Facebook. The value of social networks for scientists lies in faster access to information relevant to their research and the communities that are made more available by new tools. Here are 6 successful examples which can be used to understand scientific social communities. Facebook Pages & LinkedIn Groups. Scientists have used mailing lists and forums for years. Facebook pages and LinkedIn groups are a ’2.0′ version of them with the benefits of centralization and easier access to participants. Life science companies, most notably Life Technologies, have fostered social networks in the form of Facebook pages centered on […]

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The Top 10 Life Science Twitter Hashtags of 2011

Yes, in fact, we are obsessed with Twitter hashtags, terms that are added to status updates surrounding a topic, event, or chat. They give insights into the discussions and trends by anyone on Twitter who wants to join in, and allow us to discover new people and ideas. We track all the life science hashtags we’ve found, with a bent towards the research tools area (e.g., non-FDA regulated products). We’ve analyzed the utilization of all hashtags in our compilation and have identified the top 10 in 2011 based on the number of Twitter status updates tagged with them. We’re also enamored with word clouds and have displayed them in a clickable image below linked to a Twitter search of the term, the largest words indicating the top hashtags in 2011 (note Twitter searches go back only 8 days, some links may give no results). We’ve listed the top ten in the table below. Note that this list is by no means perfect, we’ve tried our best to find all the life science hashtags, but may have missed a few, be sure to comment below if you’d like us to track others. Additionally, some topics may extend outside of life science, […]

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Chemists Can Tweet: #ACSDenver Twitter Analysis Shows Communication, Web 2.0 Topic Trends

One of the questions we get frequently is regarding the popularity of social media for different types of life scientists. While it’s true that some computer-intensive fields such as bioinformatics lend themselves to more social media savviness, we find that many different types of life scientists participate. We performed a Social Media Compass™ Twitter analysis (PDF) on the recent American Chemical Society meeting in Denver and found that chemists are very interested in using new media to communicate. As we covered in a recent post about life science hashtags, they can be used to track events, and we followed the ACS Fall 2011 meeting using the #acsdenver hashtag. There were more than 2000 Tweets from 466 Twitterers from July 30-September 17th, and with 12,000 in attendance, less than 4% of the attendees Tweeted (with the caveat that some Tweets come from people who weren’t at the conference). This is in the normal range for what we see at life science conferences, and we also seen many researchers in ‘listening’ mode, so more likely participated by watching. Also, the Tweets and links will have an impact on search engine results for months or perhaps even years. Our Social Media Compass Twitter […]

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Hashtags: Helping Life Scientists Communicate With Social Media

Hashtags: Helping Life Scientists Communicate With Social Media

Hashtags are text strings prefixed with a ‘#’ character which are used mostly on Twitter to tag status updates as belonging to an event or discussion. Life scientist Twitter usage varies widely between disciplines, and we can understand why and glean useful information about trends and influencers by analyzing Twitter conversations using the hashtags as a search query. For this post we’ll use the associated Life Science Hashtags Google spreadsheet and our social media monitoring tools to describe and document the different types of life science hashtags. Our goal is to help the community better communicate through increased understanding and standardization of life science hashtags. Conferences are the most straightforward utilization of hashtags, the organizers are (normally) the arbiters of the correct identifier for tweets (Twitter status updates) from the event. The conference hashtag is normally listed on the conference website, or you can look for them being used in the designated Twitter account (listed on the Google doc, and for a shortcut follow our life science conference Twitter list). You can see on the spreadsheet we’ve done analyses of the tweets that came from some of the recent conferences, the number of updates varies from hundreds to thousands for […]

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What’s the Hashtag for Google+? #google+ #googleplus #gplus #g+ ?

A quick post regarding the hashtags and terms people are using to describe Google+, the new social network. We had problems deciding what to call the application in our recent post and decided to do an analysis, as we know that using the proper hashtag or term means more exposure. Using our social media monitoring tools, we did a ‘quick and dirty’ count of both the hashtags (terms prefixed with a “#”, used mostly on Twitter) and the terms used to describe the application. The charts are below, and you can see that #google+ and #googleplus are most popular hashtags, and Google+ and g+ are the terms used most often. Notice also that the volume for the terms is up to 40X that for the corresponding hashtag, and with the latter considered to be used for tips and by those who are more “serious” about a topic. Our suggestion? Stick with Google+ and #google+ but remember that the “+” is a special character and may be ‘lost in translation’ in cases such as RSS feeds, tags, etc. (e.g., notice that the “+”‘s have been removed from the permalink/URL when WordPress generated it from the title, and I am unable to […]

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