Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

Life Science Digital Marketing Trends: Comprendia’s ‘Lucky Seven’ Year Predictions

Life Science Digital Marketing Trends: Comprendia's 'Lucky Seven' Year Predictions

Comprendia was founded in June of 2008, which means we are beginning our 7th year. For this occasion, I’ve decided to reflect about the future of life science digital marketing and I present five predictions which are open to discussion. First, I’ll give a bit of a background. In late May/early June 2008, I was finishing up with the Comprendia logo and forming the LLC, getting the PO box, trademark, and all the trappings of a new business. I wasn’t sure how to set up the website—I’d used WordPress personally and was familiar with it for blogging, but would the platform be suitable for a corporate website? Believe it or not, few companies were using WordPress at that time, but I found a few examples and went for it. I caught a very lucky break as the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) convention was in San Diego that June, and they were accepting bloggers. I signed up, blogged, and have covered several conventions since then. Currently Comprendia is working to provide local coverage of the BIO 2014 convention through the San Diego Biotechnology Network (SDBN). In addition, we liaise with biotech companies, their customers, and science communicators in many ways and […]

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Life Science Social Media: Getting Started, Part 2: Specific Resources

Life Science Social Media: Getting Started, Part 2: Specific Resources

View on Storify. [View the story “Life Science Social Media: Getting Started, Part 2: Specific Resources” on Storify]

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Life Science Social Media: Getting Started, Part 1: General Resources

Life Science Social Media: Getting Started, Part 1: General Resources

View on Storify. [View the story “Life Science Social Media: Getting Started, Part 1: General Resources” on Storify]

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Are 40% Of Life Science Company Facebook Page ‘Likes’ From Fake Users?

Facebook has been getting a lot of negative press recently, with a BBC report about fake users as well as this viral post from a company claiming that 80% of the ‘likes’ they acquired through advertising were not from real accounts. Should life science companies be concerned about this matter? Our analysis shows that it may be a issue for company pages which have grown quickly through advertising, with as much as 40% of the ‘likes’ being suspected fakes in our estimation. Here we give best practices for avoiding this problem. Facebook provides a few ‘back door’ ways of analyzing the likes for almost any page, and we should note that we do not know how accurate these numbers are. The purpose of this post is to encourage life science companies to review their own page statistics and advertising methodology. We started our analysis by looking at the top cities for the life science Facebook pages with the most likes (a full list of the pages can be found in the likes of the Comprendia Facebook page). The ‘Top City’ for most pages can be seen by clicking on the likes link directly below the ‘thumbs up’ image on the […]

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Facebook’s Promoted Posts For Pages: Do They Work?

We tried out Facebook’s new promoted page posts feature and were quite pleased with the results. We had seen previously that only about 20% of our fans see our San Diego Biotechnology Network Facebook page posts (part one of figure below, 300 of 1800 fans saw an unpromoted post). We spent $5 to promote the post shown in the middle of the figure below—and note that for now you must post from the Facebook web application, promoting does not work for automatic posts. We were happy to see that we got four times the impressions and four ‘likes.’ For this page, we consider 1-2 likes good for a post, so these results were great. We know that Facebook uses ‘likes’ to decide how often to show a post, and while you obviously can’t buy these, we think the promoted posts could increase views and engagement. We were initially concerned that our page fans might be irritated by a promoted post, but this wasn’t the case, and you can see how the post looks to them at the bottom of the figure. Of course, choose promoted content carefully and see what works with your fans. In short, Facebook promoted page posts […]

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Everyone Googles: How To Leverage The Tool All Life Scientists Use

Everyone Googles: How To Leverage The Tool All Life Scientists Use

Believe it or not, we still run into life science companies who haven’t drunk the social media Kool-Aid. In other words, they don’t think their customers use the applications and are not ready to commit to spending resources on them. My answer to them? Everyone Googles. New media has a profound affect on the results from the tool that most of us use daily to get everything from news to recipes. Life scientists are no different, and find technical information, publications, and information about products using Google. Here, we’ll show you 5 ways to capitalize on the pervasiveness of Google drive more traffic to your website and to make broader improvements to your marketing process. Simple Search Engine Optimization (SEO). There is a lot of low hanging fruit that we see many life science companies missing out of in terms of SEO. Surprisingly, it is left off of many web development projects. The web is full of quick guides, and here are our recommendations: Do keyword research and find the top terms people are searching for. Use the top keywords in the titles, content, and SEO summaries of each page. Always write for humans, not the search robots, as no […]

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What Is A Scientific Social Network? 6 Thriving and Inspiring Examples

What Is A Scientific Social Network? 6 Thriving and Inspiring Examples

A recent article from the Huffington Post states that social networks for scientists won’t work because there is no incentive from a career perspective. The piece focuses on ResearchGate and takes a stab at the Economist’s article about the community. Here at Comprendia, we’ve never advocated that Facebook should be recreated for scientists, as there are 700,000+ life science graduates in the US already using the application,* and they are likely already connected there to lab mates and colleagues. Rather, we should broaden our idea of the ‘social network’ to include any online community of scientists, not just those which are similar to Facebook. The value of social networks for scientists lies in faster access to information relevant to their research and the communities that are made more available by new tools. Here are 6 successful examples which can be used to understand scientific social communities. Facebook Pages & LinkedIn Groups. Scientists have used mailing lists and forums for years. Facebook pages and LinkedIn groups are a ‘2.0’ version of them with the benefits of centralization and easier access to participants. Life science companies, most notably Life Technologies, have fostered social networks in the form of Facebook pages centered on […]

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Life Science Facebook Engagement: Which Companies Are Creating ‘Contagious’ Pages?

Recently Facebook announced a new metric, ‘people talking about,’ would be available on the left sidebar of pages below the number of likes. The number shows how many people have interacted with the page by liking it, commenting, or sharing, and it is meant to show how active a page is. We used this number to do an analysis of around 45 life science companies on Facebook, helping us to understand which companies are successfully engaging life scientists, and why they are successful. Two charts are needed to fully understand the data, and you can also look at the raw data in the Google document. The first chart shows the number of ‘people talking about’ for each page, along with the percent engagement, or this number divided by the total number of ‘likes’ for a page. You can see that Life Technologies holds all five top spots for ‘people talking about’: Invitrogen, Applied BioSystems, Life Technologies, Molecular Probes Handbook Club, and GIBCO Cell Culture. We applaud them for their efforts, and have been tracking their activity, which helps us to understand what the numbers mean. The Invitrogen and Applied BioSystems pages were launched about six months ago, and we noticed […]

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5 Reasons Why Google+ Could Be a Game Changer for Life Science #googleplus

I’ll admit I was skeptical of Google+, the new social network from the search engine giant, because I knew Google had given up their previous attempts with their products Wave and Buzz, which were in a similar vein. However, it soon became apparent that Google+ was different in many ways, from the offerings to the way everyone was talking about it. What promise does it hold for life science? I think that there are many features of Google+ which researchers and companies will find useful, and that it may become very popular. Here are the reasons: Threaded discussions. Social media savvy life scientists really like Friendfeed, which allows for users to comment on posted items in targeted groups, resulting in relevant discussions which can be followed by all in the group. Currently, this is difficult with applications like Twitter. Friendfeed was bought by Facebook 2 years ago, and ever since then, the community has been worried about changes or the disappearance of the application. While Facebook has threaded discussion features, some life scientists dislike aspects of it and have eschewed it for various reasons, some of which are described below. The fact that Google+ has threaded conversations is big for […]

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Sound Bytes: Links and Tips For Life Science Marketing & Social Media 5/26/2011

Here’s our most recent playlist of links and tips for life science marketing and social media: Sigma updates website. Sigma Adrich has updated their website. It looks nice (except I think they need to be consistent with the red–it’s too light at the top) and time will tell whether life science researchers find it easier to use. The video about the new site shows 4-5 staff members describing the changes and excitement they have for it (frankly I’d rather just see the updates). The video is a bit over the top–did they really work with the ‘top designers in the world’? From the web 2.0 standpoint, they now have favorites and product reviews, which is great, and it looks to be iPad compatible. Social media is not prominently displayed–links are in gray at the bottom right. They indicate that it is the ‘first stage in their digital evolution.’ The sophisticated video makes me think of this post about every company needing to be a media company now. Is your company expanding its video production team? Tineye image search. This is cool. Ever see an image in an Ad, or get sent an image that someone in your group wants to […]

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