Posts Tagged ‘engagement’

Why You Should Be Doing More Life Science Market Research

Why You Should Be Doing More Life Science Market Research

So many things have changed in the digital age that it is sometimes hard to judge which parts of your marketing plan should change, and which should remain constant. Life science market research is an area in which we recommend you revise your strategy, and we explain the top five reasons below. Increasing segmentation. Life scientists are becoming more segmented online, being able to choose from myriad journal feeds and news sources that fit their research field. Methods for reaching your customers must be equally segmented, and you need to understand their needs and habits. The results and even the process of doing more market research will benefit you. For example, if you promote your survey on Twitter and don’t get a good response, you know that this application is not a good way to reach your customers. Improving the amount and relevancy of your life science market research will ensure that you know the best way to reach and engage your customers. Need for customer engagement. Your customers are now choosing which life science companies, if any, to follow and interact with online. These decisions require engagement, whether it be liking a Facebook page, commenting on a post, or […]

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Three Ways To Get Involved With ScienceOnline NOW To Make A Difference In 2013

Since our founding in 2008, we’ve been big proponents of ScienceOnline and one of our major goals is to bridge science bloggers and companies to make the industry more robust. This movement represents a sea change in many areas of science and so the revolution feels more like a glacier melting than a waterfall. With the conference approaching at the end of January next year, there are at least three ways you can get involved to make a difference. Sponsor the ScienceOnline conference. The digital influencers you’re so anxious to engage will be at ScienceOnline in North Carolina or watching the conversations via Twitter, etc. By sponsoring, you’ll be reaching them as well as helping a good cause, as better science communication positively impacts the industry and us all personally. Check out the sponsorship opportunities and email Karyn Traphagen for more information. It would be a great way to spend that extra end of the year budget you have. Local Watch Parties. The ScienceOnline conference in North Carolina is so popular that there’s a long waiting list. Local watch parties are being organized to both fill this void and also to help this movement to flourish with more face to […]

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5 Lessons Life Science Marketers Can Learn From Presidential Campaigns

I watched President Obama’s speech last night and was amazed by his presence and vision, and since 2008 I’ve been following him through various channels such as email, Twitter, and Facebook. Indeed, his 2008 campaign strategy was covered in Seth Godin’s ‘Tribes’ book and is a great example of using digital media to engage and enlist followers. Regardless of the outcome of the 2012 election, the activities of both candidates are worth studying with an eye towards life science marketing, and we review the most important lessons here. Messaging is important. By now you all know three words that the Obama campaign have used to brand their last two campaigns: Hope, Change, and Forward. Hmmmm, what are the messages of the other candidates? I can’t remember them. Identifying succinct messaging is vital for branding your company and products to your customer, helping all employees communicate a consistent message. Read twice, publish once. Mitt Romney’s campaign was lampooned for having 3 copy editing errors in a space of a few weeks. Obviously, these mistakes reflect negatively on the campaign, especially when the opposition gets wind of them. While your biggest competitor is unlikely to point out your errors, it still affects […]

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If A Tweet Falls In The Forest? Maximizing Twitter Engagement Through Time Of Day Analysis

You may have seen data or applications which tell you what time of day that you should post Twitter status updates for maximal effect because people are more likely to see and share your Tweets. I’ve always wondered whether to follow this advice, because I had a feeling each user’s Twitter community is ‘tuned’ to the times in which they Tweet and also dependent on factors such as time zone, etc. Here is a brief analysis of the time of day I tweet as Comprendia and the replies I receive, along with recommendations based on the analysis and general guidelines for using timing to improve Twitter engagement and exposure. We used our own Twitter analysis software and data to determine the time of day (in US Pacific Time) status updates were posted during a 6 month period (January 14-July 14 2012) and the data are graphed in the figure in this post. On average, the maximum number of hourly Tweets from the Comprendia account (blue line) occurs between 7-8 a.m., with another peak between 4-5 p.m. For the replies to Comprendia, we tracked all tweets containing “@Comprendia,” including retweets and replies. Perhaps not surprisingly, the peaks in the replies to […]

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Facebook’s Promoted Posts For Pages: Do They Work?

We tried out Facebook’s new promoted page posts feature and were quite pleased with the results. We had seen previously that only about 20% of our fans see our San Diego Biotechnology Network Facebook page posts (part one of figure below, 300 of 1800 fans saw an unpromoted post). We spent $5 to promote the post shown in the middle of the figure below—and note that for now you must post from the Facebook web application, promoting does not work for automatic posts. We were happy to see that we got four times the impressions and four ‘likes.’ For this page, we consider 1-2 likes good for a post, so these results were great. We know that Facebook uses ‘likes’ to decide how often to show a post, and while you obviously can’t buy these, we think the promoted posts could increase views and engagement. We were initially concerned that our page fans might be irritated by a promoted post, but this wasn’t the case, and you can see how the post looks to them at the bottom of the figure. Of course, choose promoted content carefully and see what works with your fans. In short, Facebook promoted page posts […]

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Life Science Conferences and Twitter: What Factors Lead To Better Engagement?

It’s been about nine months since we did our initial report on the utilization of hashtags at life science conferences. Now that the spring 2012 conference ‘season’ is almost over, we wanted to look at Twitter conversations tracked by the hashtags for each event. By tabulating the number of Twitter status updates and comparing it to the total number of attendees, we find that between 3.5 and 12.5% of life science conference attendees Tweet about the event. Here we discuss the trends and factors which affect life science conference Twitter engagement with an eye towards improving communication, resulting in a better experience for all. We judged the amount of Twitter activity by looking at the number of attendees, the number of status updates or Tweets, and number Twitterers for five of the major life science conferences since November 2011. Some meetings (ASCB, SLAS) were not included in the analysis because their Tweet volume was much smaller. Additionally, conferences for the ‘uber engaged’ scientists such as ScienceOnline were not included as their stats would dwarf that of the ‘mainstream’ conferences. The results of these tabulations are shown in the table below. Conference No. Attendees No. Tweets % Attendees Tweeting Hashtag Listing […]

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Life Science Facebook Engagement: Which Companies Are Creating ‘Contagious’ Pages?

Recently Facebook announced a new metric, ‘people talking about,’ would be available on the left sidebar of pages below the number of likes. The number shows how many people have interacted with the page by liking it, commenting, or sharing, and it is meant to show how active a page is. We used this number to do an analysis of around 45 life science companies on Facebook, helping us to understand which companies are successfully engaging life scientists, and why they are successful. Two charts are needed to fully understand the data, and you can also look at the raw data in the Google document. The first chart shows the number of ‘people talking about’ for each page, along with the percent engagement, or this number divided by the total number of ‘likes’ for a page. You can see that Life Technologies holds all five top spots for ‘people talking about’: Invitrogen, Applied BioSystems, Life Technologies, Molecular Probes Handbook Club, and GIBCO Cell Culture. We applaud them for their efforts, and have been tracking their activity, which helps us to understand what the numbers mean. The Invitrogen and Applied BioSystems pages were launched about six months ago, and we noticed […]

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How Does Web 2.0 Increase Life Science Product Sales?

Almost every life science company we talk to about web 2.0 and social media has the same question: what’s the return on investment (ROI)? We’ve discussed that the ROI equation for social media strategies and tactics is the same, but that the ‘expense’ and ‘payback’ calculations will likely be different. In this post, we’ll discuss two reports which show that web 2.0 sites have increased traffic and engagement, and that customers who are engaged buy more. Together, they present a strong argument that adding web 2.0 features can directly and positively impact a company’s sales. Web 2.0 sites are dynamic and interactive, and include sites which the user can add content to such as blogs, forums, and wikis. The first report we’ll discuss is titled ‘Traffic metrics and Web 2.0-ness‘ and it was published in Online Information Review from a group in Taiwan. They surveyed the online habits of about 1000 people and correlated metrics such as sites visited, page views per site, and duration per page on site with the degree of ‘Web 2.0-ness’ a website had. The researchers found a positive correlation between the Web 2.0-ness of a site and users’ understanding of its content and the number […]

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Five Things We Wish Life Science Company Blogs Would Do

We think it’s great that we can count 33 life science company blogs on our list, and we applaud those companies who are leveraging this flavor of social media. You may know that we are blog aficionados, however, and that we are very…ahem…opinionated as to how corporate blogs should be designed, both strategically and tactically. While I’m hesitant to specifically call out blogs that need improvement, I’ll provide my top five ‘wishes’ for them below to help life science companies succeed. Use WordPress.org. There are several ways in which you can implement a blog ranging from 3rd party sites (e.g., WordPress.com, TypePad) which will host the site for you, to software that is installed on your web server (e.g., WordPress.org). Installing WordPress.org may take a bit longer at the very beginning, but it offers much more flexibility, and the benefits far outweigh any initial delays (which really should be minimal because the software is constantly becoming easier to install and use). WordPress.org is more versatile because there is much more control over the interface and functionality of your blog. WordPress.org installations allow access to hundreds of modules called themes and plugins, giving unlimited interface and branding options. We see several […]

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